On cold mornings I like to get up and feed the baby around five, make coffee on the wood stove, and, when the little ones begin to stir, light candles to make breakfast by.

Some mornings are met with this Soaked Rye and Oat Breakfast "Cake", a close cousin to baked oatmeal. You know there’s extra butter on top and almost always a good bit of kefir to pour over it.

There are also pots of simple bean soups simmering, made nourishing from the addition of broth and a bit of bacon. So cheap, so simple, so yummy.

This homemade pumpkin pie spice mix is finding its way into all sorts of things, including…

…this grain, sugar, and dairy-free Pumpkin Porridge. It’s like pumpkin pie (or a hug) in a bowl.

On a cold evening when we were expecting a frost we harvested our last row of sweet potatoes. The greens came in to be used in eggs and stir fries the following days.

And then there was pie. Apple, to be precise, made from this Honey-Sweetened Apple Pie with Rye Crust recipe. And their may be a bit of a pie manifesto in there too.

Remember that Rye Sourdough Bread I’ve been making. Yeah, that was gooood french toast.

And, with full days their must be a pot, or five, that can be an all-in-one meal. We really enjoyed this One Pot Chicken and Brown Rice with Fall Vegetables.

 I’ll close the kitchen tonight for the Sabbath on which both mama and the kitchen get a little break. And we’ll start once again Sunday with a crackling wood stove, coffee, and of course candles.

 

7 Responses to From the Kitchen

  1. jenny says:

    Love seeing and hearing about your everyday life. I had no idea I could use the greens from our sweet potatoes! Something to keep in mind for next year. I bought the ebook bundle and have been working my way through a few books. Well worth the little bit of money spent for SO many books!

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  2. Linda McNary says:

    I love reading about your life and all that your doing. I wish I could do what you do. I’m excited to try some of your recipes. Very interested in the pumpkin poridge…thanks.

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  3. Cynthia says:

    I had no idea that I could use the sweet potato leaves and foolishly composted them, we never grew them on the farm and this was our first year with them. Once again I am enlightened, thank you.

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  4. Anna says:

    Hi! I have always been taught that potato vines/greens were toxic, even though their tubers are fine to eat. Are sweet potato greens different? I would love it if I could use them but I’m very hesitant because I know that potatoes are in the ipomoea family – which is a very poisonous family of plants…I would love to hear your knowledge on this. And keep the great posts coming, I love your blog!

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    Shannon Reply:

    Yes, Sweet Potatoes are a completely different type of plant than regular potatoes. Here are some other well known sites where you can see that they are in fact edible and safe:
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/relish/sweet-potato-leaves-recipe-zb0z11zwar.aspx
    http://www.permies.com/t/17641/plants/Sweet-Potato-Leaves-Edible-Raw

    Hope that helps!

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  5. Anna says:

    Thank you so much for the reply. I’m excited to try the leaves!

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  6. Christy says:

    Can’t wait to try your rye and oat cake. We SO need another breakfast option! My hubby is borderline diabetic, so I’m always looking for recipes without processed sugar. Thank you so much!

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